SAE International’s Book on Automotive Glass Engineering Wins APEX Award of Excellence

 

‎Lyn R Zbinden‬ Author of Glass Engineering ‪
5⭐️Amazon.com http://amzn.to/1Q3vvp
5⭐️goodreads http://bit.ly/1PgYyCM
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Available now! Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications by Lyn R. Zbinden http://www.amazon.com http://amzn.to/1XsI8ho or via SAE http://www.sae.org/news/3040/

Veiling Glare

Veiling Glare

Veiling glare occurs when light reflects on the instrument panel (IP) top surface into the windscreen and creates veiling reflections in the driver’s field of vision.

It reduces the contrast of the road scene making it harder for the driver to detect different objects while driving.

Veiling glare is dangerous because the reflections from the instrument panel and other ghost like images have the ability to completely blind the drivers’ point of vision. Light that is reflected or scattered from a vehicle windshield toward the eyes of a driver creates a veiling luminance that the driver must look through in order to see the roadway ahead.

To what degree this phenomenon will affect the driver depends on how strong the reflections are and the lightness of the background environment. When driving towards a light background the veiling glare is barely visible but if the background is dark the effect of the reflexes increases significantly and can create a dangerous traffic situation. A good example of this is when you drive into a tunnel or garage on a sunny day.

It’s possible to divide veiling glare into two types. One type is when the entire instrument panel reflects into the driver’s eyes and creates a veil of reflecting light, which decreases the contrast in the entire field of vision and makes it hard to see the road. This type of veiling glare is highly dependent on the lightness of the IP material as shown. This has been a driving force in Original Equipment Manufactures (OEM) offering only one IP top cover in matte black. This not only mitigates veiling glare but also reduces part number warehousing and man-hours.

VG1

The other type is when veiling glare creates disturbing reflection effects in the windshield, so called ghost images. The reason for this disturbing reflection is contrast differences on the instrument panel caused by split lines, different shapes and features like defroster grills and labels. The stronger the contrasts are, the greater is the risk for annoyance for the driver. Usually, the reflections from an instrument panel reflecting up into the windscreen consists of a mix of both types of veiling glare.

 

I initiated a study while working at General Motors in the mid 1990s to investigate which factors affected the intensity of veiling glare. The result showed that windshield angle, gloss/texture of the IP, value or tone of IP material and IP angle had the greatest effect on the amount of veiling glare. To minimize the amount of veiling glare, you have to work with the design of the instrument panel angle and surface as well as the angle of the windshield. In many cases designing a quarter moon brow shading the gauges will mitigate the glare emanating from the instrument cluster. The sun angle also has, of course, a great effect on veiling glare, but it’s a factor you can’t control.

The specular glare angle is the particular angle of the sun, dependent on the vehicle geometry, that produces specular reflections first of the IP into the windshield and then off the windshield and into the driver’s eyes. A specular reflection occurs when the sunlight angle of incidence and the angle of reflection are equal relative to the surface normal at the point of reflection.

VG2

The specular glare angle is unique for a given windshield and IP angle combination and is calculated with the following formula:

Specular Glare Angle = 2 x (90 – (Windshield Angle + IP angle))

VG3

Many studies have been made to determine the windshield angle’s importance to the amount of veiling glare. At General Motors Veiling Glare is part of the windshield manufacturing criteria. Some latitude is given to this because the failure modes are not as critical as other criteria for glass manufacturing. Windshield angles larger than 60°, measured from the vertical plane, have a rapidly increasing effect on the proportion of reflected light and cabin heat load. It’s clearly preferred to try to use a windshield angle below 60 degrees but there’s also the possibility to work with anti – reflective coatings to decrease veiling glare.

Available now! Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications by Lyn R. Zbinden http://www.amazon.com http://amzn.to/1XsI8ho or via SAE http://www.sae.org/news/3040/

Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications; Chapters include

“Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” addresses the theme of glass from the manufacturing stage to the design, installation, and warranty aspects. It also flags, along the way, the pitfalls and the important questions to ask. More importantly, it provides the reader with practical ways to solve the not-so-obvious problems associated with the use of automotive glass.

Chapters include:
Ceramics, Raw Materials, and Processing
Glass and Thermal Stress
Forming for Specific Vehicle Positions
Design Guidelines and Applications
Ceramic Frit and Shadeband
Adhesive Bonding
Moldings, Encapsulation, and Related Opportunities
Installation and Post Processing
Testing Tables
Design Rule Tables
Design and Processing Notes and Tables

Available now! Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications by Lyn R. Zbinden http://www.amazon.com http://amzn.to/1XsI8ho or via SAE http://www.sae.org/news/3040/

Why You Should Hire Rebels

 

Because they are uncomfortable with the status quo

Because they will challenge you
Because they will push for change
Because they don’t fit your corporate culture of samesame
Because they will ask many questions that start with “why”
Because they don’t fit your paradigm of safe

Rebels have the ability to transform lives, transform our society. They will drive change and a new tomorrow. They will help you prioritize and focus on the things that matter now and in the future

Available now! Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications by Lyn R. Zbinden http://www.amazon.com http://amzn.to/1XsI8ho or via SAE http://www.sae.org/news/3040/

Lyn R. Zbinden winner of the 2015 APEX Award of Excellence at the 27th Annual Awards for Publication Excellence

SAE International’s Book on Automotive Glass Engineering Wins APEX Award of Excellence

WARRENDALE, Pa., June 4, 2015 –

SAE International’s book, “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” is honored with a 2015 APEX Award of Excellence for Publication Excellence.

The APEX Awards are an annual competition for publishers, editors, writers and designers who create print, web, electronic and social media. The awards are based on excellence in editorial content, graphic design, and the success of the entry – in the opinion of the judges – in achieving overall communications effectiveness and excellence. The 2015 competition included 1,851 entries (120 in the Print Media category).The APEX judges saw only the most promising publications that professional communicators could enter.

Written by Lyn R. Zbinden, a mechanical engineer and glass specialist, “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” narrows the gap between the reader and a technical subject by using language that is easy to understand, a good variety of examples, and a series of invaluable reference design tables. The book also addresses the theme of glass from the manufacturing stage to the design, installation, and warranty aspects. It also flags, along the way, the pitfalls and the important questions to ask. More importantly, it provides the reader with practical ways to solve the not-so-obvious problems associated with the use of automotive glass.

For more information about “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” visit http://books.sae.org/r-433/. To request a media review copy, email pr@sae.org or call 1-724-772-8522.

SAE International is a global association committed to being the ultimate knowledge source for the engineering profession. By uniting over 137,000 engineers and technical experts, we drive knowledge and expertise across a broad spectrum of industries. We act on two priorities: encouraging a lifetime of learning for mobility engineering professionals and setting the standards for industry engineering. We strive for a better world through the work of our philanthropic SAE Foundation, including programs like A World in Motion® and the Collegiate Design Series™.        – http://www.sae.org

EAward2


“Books from SAE International” 2 week sale

                                             

Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 9.31.34 AM

Congratulations. SAE International has won a 2015 APEX Award of Excellence at the 27th Annual Awards for Publication Excellence, sponsored by Communications Concepts, Inc. This award recognizes R-433: “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” by Lyn Zbinden (http://books.sae.org/r-433/).

The APEX Awards are an annual competition for publishers, editors, writers and designers who create print, web, electronic and social media. The awards are based on excellence in editorial content, graphic design, and the success of the entry – in the opinion of the judges – in achieving overall communications effectiveness and excellence. The 2015 competition included 1,851 entries (120 in the Print Media category).The APEX judges saw only the most promising publications that professional communicators could enter.
For more about the APEX Awards you can visit: http://www.apexawards.com

Award winner background

Apex 2015_winner

SAE International – June 4 at 9:00am

        Apex 2015_winner                                         

SAE International News
June 4 at 9:00am
SAE International’s Book on Automotive Glass Engineering Wins APEX Award of Excellence
WARRENDALE, Pa. (June 4, 2015) – SAE International’s book, “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” is honored with a 2015 APEX Award of Excellence for Publication Excellence.
The APEX Awards are an annual competition for publishers, editors, writers and designers who create print, web, electronic and social media. The awards are based on excellence in editorial content, graphic design, and the success of the entry – in the opinion of the judges – in achieving overall communications effectiveness and excellence. The 2015 competition included 1,851 entries (120 in the Print Media category).The APEX judges saw only the most promising publications that professional communicators could enter.
Written by Lyn R. Zbinden, a mechanical engineer and glass specialist, “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” narrows the gap between the reader and a technical subject by using language that is easy to understand, a good variety of examples, and a series of invaluable reference design tables. The book also addresses the theme of glass from the manufacturing stage to the design, installation, and warranty aspects. It also flags, along the way, the pitfalls and the important questions to ask. More importantly, it provides the reader with practical ways to solve the not-so-obvious problems associated with the use of automotive glass.
For more information about “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” visit http://books.sae.org/r-433/. To request a media review copy, email pr@sae.org or call 1-724-772-8522.
SAE International is a global association committed to being the ultimate knowledge source for the engineering profession. By uniting over 137,000 engineers and technical experts, we drive knowledge and expertise across a broad spectrum of industries. We act on two priorities: encouraging a lifetime of learning for mobility engineering professionals and setting the standards for industry engineering. We strive for a better world through the work of our philanthropic SAE Foundation, including programs like A World in Motion® and the Collegiate Design Series™.
http://www.sae.org
Contact: Shawn Andreassi of SAE International, 1-724-772-8522 or pr@sae.org
SAE International News’s photo.

 

 

 

 

SAE International has won a 2015 APEX Award of Excellence at the 27th Annual Awards for Publication Excellence

        Apex 2015_winner                                         

Congratulations. SAE International has won a 2015 APEX Award of Excellence at the 27th Annual Awards for Publication Excellence, sponsored by Communications Concepts, Inc. This award recognizes R-433: “Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications,” by Lyn Zbinden (http://books.sae.org/r-433/).

The APEX Awards are an annual competition for publishers, editors, writers and designers who create print, web, electronic and social media. The awards are based on excellence in editorial content, graphic design, and the success of the entry – in the opinion of the judges – in achieving overall communications effectiveness and excellence. The 2015 competition included 1,851 entries (120 in the Print Media category).The APEX judges saw only the most promising publications that professional communicators could enter.
For more about the APEX Awards you can visit: http://www.apexawards.com

Award winner background

 

 

Windshield Navigation May Become a Reality by 2016 – Augmented Reality with comments from Mark Zuckerberg

SAE photo for FB

“Facebook wants to build the next major computing platform, which Zuckerberg believes could be augmented reality and Oculus. He also wants to bring the internet to more people through Internet.org.”

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/zuckerbergs-3-5-and-10-year-facebook-plan-2014-10#ixzz3HYbURZOM

 

Samsung

Displaying navigation information on car windshields may become reality in less than a decade. If thin, transparent and curved display panels could be attached to a windscreen, drivers would be able to see navigation information displayed there.

There are challenges to this application, namely cost and durability. The inside surface of a windscreen (surface 4) takes abuse, such as parking stickers. This has been the main factoring for not using polycarbonate as the inner layer. Previously HUD worked with aid of a wedged Poly Vinyl Butyral (PVB), looks like that may change.  Head-up displays make driver and vehicle information easily accessible by projecting it onto the windshield just below the driver´s line of sight.

Without taking the eyes off of the road, drivers are informed of important vehicle data, such as speed, engine warnings or navigation data. For its realization a wedge shaped PVB-film is necessary. The wedge shaped film avoids the formation of echo images. Those echo images are dependent on the angle and the thickness of the windshield as well as the angle of incidence of the beam.

Standard wedge angles are defined in order to avoid special developments for every type of windshield. For production of the wedge shaped film small flexible extrusion lines up to a film width of 1200mm are necessary. Colour band film is also available. The loss of thickness during the stretching process of the film has to be compensated in the production process. The related technology is expected to become commercialized by no later than 2016.

jaguar-land-rover-pare-brise-virtuel
Recently, LG Display unveiled the world’s first transparent and curved displays. In order to use the display for windshields, these two technologies must be combined, so that the screen becomes both transparent and curved. The transparency also needs to be improved, she added. The new LG transparent OLED display features a transmittance of 30%, up from 10% for conventional LCD panels. But, to make the panel for car windshields, the transmittance rate needs to be pushed up to over 60%.

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The world’s first flexible display developed by LG Display

This is not simple because most electrodes which are used for display panels are opaque. Currently, research is being carried out to find alternative materials such as graphene, which is transparent and conducts electricity.
There is also a visibility issue because users may not be able to clearly see the information displayed on the screen during the day, when it is brighter outside than it is inside the car.
Apart from the technical hurdles, safety issues still remain as the windshields would hinder the drivers’ visibility. This is why transparent displays for vehicles will first be used for entertainment purposes ― made for passengers in the back seat or riding shotgun, as I wrote about in a previous column
Regarding the visibility issue for the passenger seats, companies are developing a “shutter” technology, which is inserted into display panels to make the background black. This will have the same kind of effect you would have when you draw the curtains at home to get a clearer image on your TV screen.

According to sources, the global transparent display market will reach $87 billion by 2015.

Head-up displays with “augmented reality,” the technology that employs much of the windshield as a display area for data and images, is poised to significantly change how drivers see the road.

HUD

Auto supplier Continental AG says it has lined up a production contract to supply its new HUD technology for an unnamed customer in 2017.

It allows you to have your eyes constantly on the road, You can travel blindly for quite a few meters.”

Suppliers use the phrase “augmented reality” to describe large, multicolor head-up displays that superimpose data or images across much of the driver’s field of vision through the windshield.

Companies such as Nippon Seiki, Harman, Visteon, Bosch, Panasonic, Delphi and others are developing head-up displays, and Denso has said it will market its own version of augmented reality.

Continental displayed its technology this month to reporters in a modified Kia K900 on public roads near Babenhausen, a town near Frankfurt where Continental designs and produces head-up displays.

For the motorist, the transition from a conventional HUD to augmented reality is like switching from a small, portable black-and-white TV to a big-screen TV.

There’s a big difference in image size, color and definition, and that allows engineers considerably more freedom to display useful data for the motorist.

Continental’s new unit is actually two HUDs packaged together. The first is a conventional unit that displays the vehicle’s speed, directions for the motorist’s next turn and a lane-departure warning.

The basic unit’s display floats about 8 feet in front of the motorist through the bottom of the windshield, a typical HUD position.

The second unit produces a virtual display about 25 feet in front of the motorist. When the navigation system indicates an upcoming exit, a series of virtual blue arrows floats along the route to be taken.

In addition to turn-by-turn information, the second unit displays a more elaborate lane-departure warning, collision alerts and highlights of cars on the road ahead that have been detected by the vehicle’s intelligent cruise control.

A major issue for market acceptance is the bulk of the optics box inside the instrument panel. The prototype optics fit inside a 13-liter container; Continental engineers say they will shrink the production version to 11 liters. A smaller, less expensive “combiner” HUD — which doesn’t require an expensive, custom-designed windshield — could prove to be the technology of choice for small vehicles. Combiner HUD images appear on a small, clear plastic panel mounted behind the instrument panel. These units can display basic information, but not the big, colorful images of the more expensive unit.

Augmented reality HUD has the potential to change the auto industry’s approach to instrumentation.

In Samsung’s design, see FIG. 20 noted above illustrates an example in which the transparent display apparatus is implemented in a vehicle. To be specific, the transparent display is implemented on the front glass of the vehicle. Moreover, patent FIG. 20’s information appears on the front glass while the user drives their vehicle. The information #30 noted as “Vehicle in front slowing down” is one example of a smart transparent display system. The types of information that could be displayed include condition of the vehicle, a driving condition, the surrounding environment, etc. For example, GPS information, fuel status, speed, RPM, traffic, or other vehicle information may be displayed on the front glass.

Samsung2

display of FIG. 20 may alternatively be implemented as a projection type of system. Another alternative could involve a secondary sensor may trace the gaze of the user and the position of displayed information that may be moved according to the user’s gaze.

Remember the stunning heads-up display shown on the amazing BMW i8?

BMW-i8-heads-up-display-e1325875224353

Well, you can’t have it — at least, not yet — but several manufacturers are working hard to improve the humdrum HUDs that many of us rely on for mundane details like vehicle speed and remaining fuel. The latest such gadget to cross our desk is called Navdy.

There are several things to like about Navdy:

  • For starters, its aftermarket, so nearly any kind of car can use it.
  • It also uses a gesture-based control system, meaning that, with a little bit of trial and error, drivers should be able to interact with it without much problem.
  • Navdy uses the apps that are already on your phone (Android and iPhone, for now). Navdy will allow you to control music, messaging, and more using the apps you already know and love. To minimize distractions, users have control over which app notifications appear and when, and parents can block certain apps and features when kids are behind the wheel. Navdy is developing more apps in house to augment the device’s functionality.
  • Navigation looks especially nice and useful.

That said Navdy isn’t without its flaws:

  • At a retail price of $499, it’s expensive.
  • It won’t ship until early 2015
  • It uses Bluetooth

goog_glass

Glass will soon be accessible for the drivers on their windscreens of their cars. This innovation is for professionals, who want to remain connected while driving as well. Earlier, the time spent driving could not be utilized for work and hence got wasted, but now this new technology would allow the users to focus on the road while driving and at the same time be able to pay enough attention to their work, as well.

The idea of facilitating work while driving has been brought by a San Francisco-based start-up Navdy that has unveiled Google Inc. For this, the company has designed an aftermarket console that has the capability of combining a projection display with voice and gesture controls. This system is designed to find place between the steering wheel and the windshield. At a distance of nearly six feet from the windshield a transparent image is projected by this system.

The technology called Navdy HUD (Head-Up Display) system is designed to facilitate connectivity of iPhone and android devices via Bluetooth and sharing of data via WiFi. It also provides navigation services by connecting with Google Maps and displaying the projection on the windshield. If by chance a call or message is received while using the navigation service, the screen will split into two-parts with each part displaying one of the two. While the calls can be easily taken by giving thumbs up and hung up by swiping through the windshield, messages can be read aloud to the driver.

The system is compatible with all the cars manufactured after the year 1996, and offers multiple features such as displaying the car alerts including speed, miles-to-empty and battery-voltage. The users can, also, enjoy numerous other services such as Spotify, Pandora, Google Music and messages from the social media sites, but cannot scroll through the Facebook news feed with the Navdy HUD system.

Navdy is a device that will project virtually everything you now get on your mobile device onto the windshield of your car. Think of the windshield becoming a virtual movie screen that shows navigational data from your GPS unit, incoming phone calls, text messages and more. It responds to voice commands and gestures.

Navdy is reported to have racked up $1 million in pre-orders by discounting the device, which the San Francisco-based company later intends to market for $500. Connect it to your iPhone or Android and you’ll never have to reach for them again while you are driving.  As Navdy’s marketing puts it, “No more looking down to fumble with knobs, buttons or touch screens.”

The company calls its product “The future of driving.”

While Navdy advertises itself as an antidote to distracted driving, the Internet was roiling Monday with voices challenging that. Streetsblog called it a “Scary new app.” James Sinclair’s blog at Stop and Move elaborates on those fears:

“When we’re focused on reading text, the world in the background may technically continue to be perfectly clear (as our eyes aren’t limited in focusing like cameras are), but that doesn’t mean our brain is processing it. In reality, it’s just as blurred because we’ve stopped paying attention to everything but the text. Go ahead, look at the image above and read the message — that’s all you really see.”

“Navdy may be safer than having a phone in your lap and looking down at it, but it doesn’t mean it’s a huge improvement. In fact, by making the distractions even more accessible, it might just mean more dangerous results. When your phone vibrates, you can choose to ignore it, when your new message pops into your windshield, showing that restraint becomes a little more difficult.”

The projected text message Navdy uses in its advertising is rather benign, Such as “Want to meet for coffee?”. While pondering a cup of coffee, the driver might notice that bicyclist to the right and the San Francisco trolley car up ahead. But what if the text was something more risqué, like, say, “I want to tickle your ear with a feather boa?” No distraction there?

land-rover-discovery-concept-vision-01-970x646-c

The concept isn’t exactly new. In fact, Land Rover bragged that all of the glass in its Discovery Concept Vision, which debuted in New York earlier this year, would be “Smart Glass” capable of displaying images, directions, and point of interest (POI) information to passengers.

land-rover-discovery-concept-vision-08-970x646-c

 

land-rover-discovery-concept-vision-09-970x646-c

Though Land Rover spoke of this technology in virtual concept form, Jaguar taken the tech one step further and announced that its new XE sedan with offer a laser-projected Head-Up Display, providing drivers with unprecedented augmented reality information about the world outside the car.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP7x63f7ecQ

The system will project sharp, high-contrast images on the windshield using a device that is smaller and lighter than today’s HUD projectors. These laser diodes will contribute to a larger field of view with higher contrast and an extended range of reproducible colors.

The Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept is perhaps one of the most important and impressive vehicles I’ve ever covered. It uses lasers. It has touch screens, everywhere. Heck, it is a touch screen. It knows where you’re looking and puts information there. It can be driven remotely. And that’s just the beginning.

Vision technology

Not only does the Discovery Vision Concept have a “Transparent Hood” which uses cameras and augmented reality to make the hood disappear during off-road and parking scenarios. It is also capable of displaying images; every single piece of body glass – including the panoramic moon roof – is as well.

land-rover-discovery-concept-vision-10-970x646-c

Called “Smart Glass”, the entirely transparent glass can display images just like a computer screen. This allows for all kinds applications. Perhaps most exciting is combining eye-tracking sensors and navigation information to relay point of interest (POI) information to passengers.

land-rover-discovery-concept-vision-06-970x646-c

The Smart Glass can be used for more than just data. It can also be used to tint and dim the interior, with infinite gradients – or just blacked-out with the swipe of a finger. Imagine, too, using the panoramic moon roof to display a screensaver image or mood lighting. This isn’t the only use of screens in the cabin.  Two small OLED screens are embedded into the steering wheel and can be used to operate the infotainment system. Glance through the steering wheel and the driver is privy to a digital instrument cluster on a three-million pixel high-res screen.  In the center of the cabin are two more high-res touch screens, which display system menus. The lower of the two screens flips up to reveal a storage cubby, which also includes an inductive smartphone-charging tray.

The Japanese semiconductor supplier Nichia Corp. has announced development of blue and green laser diodes that it says are specifically designed for automotive HUDs. The laser diodes are slated for production in October, 2015. According to Nichia, these laser diodes will contribute to a larger field of view with higher contrast and an extended range of reproducible colors.

The Future Now

As I wrote in a previous column, General Motors has been working on a new generation Heads up Display system as well. There are many ideal vehicles to set to utilize developing technology by General Motors Research and the students from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Israel.

GM previews augmented-reality windshield

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94dg2D-jAhM

Whichever carmaker rolls it out, using components from whichever suppliers, there is much more to come. To bridge the gap from a simple HUD projecting rudimentary data ahead of the driver to full augmented reality, a few technical improvements are needed.

 

 

 

Glass Engineering: Design Solutions for Automotive Applications

Front Cover new1904177_888397047844387_92666403008433479_n

Receive my first royalty check for my book today. Thanks to all who supported me. Sales have been strong.
http://books.sae.org/r-433/